Future Digital Resources

What impact will the mental health green paper have?

By Zoe Rooke

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5 Things to do with…. Pork

Underrated and so tasty! We go back through the archives to show you some brilliant dishes to make with pork.

Jamie Oliver's principles for superb salads

Principles of superb salads.

Jamie Oliver's principles for superb salads

Jamie’s created the best of both worlds with this awesome recipe. Based on the amazing Japanese Omurice, it’s a seemingly traditional looking omelette but cut into it to discover a delicious, silky scrambled egg filling! Served on a lush tomato salad and drizzled with chilli

Summer Sausage Pasta

This colourful recipe for a spicy sausage pasta dish ticks every box. Tastes amazing, smells amazing and is really simple to prepare. Quality sausages browned with fresh herbs, chilli and fragrant tomatoes livened up with a good glug of balsamic vinegar.

Mediterranean Roast Chicken Pasta

Beautifully juicy chicken basted in a thyme and basil oil and layered over fresh pasta in a roasted tomato and garlic sauce. Simple ingredients that are bursting with flavour, this hearty dish is perfect for all the family.

MONITORING AND FILTERING

As of September 2016, it became a mandatory requirement of KCSiE guidelines to have an online monitoring system in place. While many schools in the UK have a filtering system in place, filtering alone does not fulfil this obligation.

Filtering and monitoring complement each other but work quite differently.

What Filtering does?
Filtering works by blocking or limiting access to unsuitable websites. This helps control what your students do but doesn’t show you anything about where online and real-world dangers are in your school.

Although some filtering providers might give you reports when blocked sites have been visited, they may not be able to give you context and may only inform you after a delay.

What Active Monitoring does?
Active monitoring works across all applications on an institution’s network, meaning that all online and off-line activity on a computer or device is assessed. It is proactive and a way of safeguarding in real time .

Active monitoring uses up to date threat related libraries to create real-time alerts for safeguarding staff.

Why is active monitoring important?
Active monitoring not only can track anything that happens digitally across school, but it also gives you the freedom to use any digital resources that are available without the worry of miss-use. Not only does this allow you to keep your teaching and learning up to date, but it also gives you the opportunity to increase your students’ digital literacy and citizenship.

Whether it’s words in an email being sent, or videos viewed in a new app, all content is monitored with alerts being set up against the up-to-date libraries from multi-agencies.

Monitoring is an OFSTED requirement, not to act as a form of CCTV within your school, but to alert you to real, specific risks that have been identified through an intelligent pre-graded system. It gives your school important intelligence that can help you to identify trends and behaviours.

Active monitoring is a way of early detection of student’s problems whether it be a child protection or a mental health issue. High graded alerts can be set in real-time so that you can act on issues as soon as they happen. Early intervention is a proven method for more positive outcomes in relation to cyber-bullying, suicidal thoughts, depression, radicalisation, online grooming, self-harm and anxiety.

Active monitoring can also be customised to suit the needs of pupils in your school and allow you to discover the root of some of the issues that arise.

How does this work in the real world?
Imaginary examples that could happen based upon feedback.

 

Jemima Perdy, Year 6

Jemima types into google “the most pain-free way to kill yourself” Her teacher calls out her name and she quickly exits the screen. Although Jemima never ran the search, the phrase she typed in set off an alert which was sent to her safeguarding lead. Having been alerted, Jemima’s safeguarding lead instantly implements school procedure for a child with suicidal thoughts in the school.

 

 

 

Harry Dean Year 10

The school have noticed that Harry’s behaviour has changed recently but they don’t know the reason for the pattern. Harry, starts working on a collaborative document with a friend. They start mucking about and Harry, not daring to say it aloud, writes into the document, ‘do you fancy a zoot at break and then quickly deletes it’.The text is picked up and screen captured sending a high alert as it is referencing drugs. The safeguarding lead picks up the alert and acts on the information instantly. The boys can be caught before it is too late and the school procedure for stopping drugs can be implemented.

 

Amy Fieldy Year 11

Amy is very pretty and James in year 13 has started to befriend her. James dumps his girlfriend Cheryl as he is more interested in Amy and Cheryl is furious. She gathers together a group of year 13’s and creates a “we hate Amy Fieldy” website. The girls post malicious messages anonymously on the website and put a photo of Amy’s head on top of a boy’s body to embarrass her. Amy has confided in a teacher that all the year 11’s are ostracising her because of this website that is being shared around on social media. She doesn’t know who is doing it. The school decided to customise their software to highlight any use of the name Amy. Within 24 hours they have caught 5 girls including Cheryl posting on the website during lessons. Having gathered the evidence, they take the necessary action.

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